RGJ.com RGJ.com Homepage RGJ.com Local News RGJ.com Neighborhoods RGJ.com Sports RGJ.com Business RGJ.com Entertainment RGJ.com Local Life RGJ.com Voices RGJ.com Obituaries RGJ.com Help

CareerBuilder Find Jobs My CareerBuilder Work & Life Tools & Advice Employers


Enter Keyword(s):  


Enter a City:


Select a State:



Create a Job Alert
Get your dream job...right in your inbox!

Hourly-Paid Jobs
Pre-apply for jobs that match YOUR interests.


Sign in now and access your saved searches, resumes and more!

Job Seeker Toolkit
Use these smart tools to land your next job.

SureCheck
See what's in your background records!
10 Jobs You Can Have at Home
By Kate Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com Editor
Copyright CareerBuilder, LLC -- reprinted with permission
More than ever, workers are attracted to the 30 second commute thanks to social and economic trends. Technologies necessary for setting up a home office are widely available, relatively inexpensive and getting easier for people to use. And, more workers are seeking flexible schedules to care for aging parents and children.

Work from home doesn't necessarily go hand in hand with entrepreneurship. There are many companies that offer or are open to providing work from home opportunities to employees.

Why do employers like the work from home option? By offering this benefit, a smaller company may be able to attract quality employees who might garner higher salaries from larger competitors. Lower costs are involved due to smaller and fewer office spaces needed. Plus, workers often have their own equipment.

If you want to make the case to a potential employer or your boss to let you work from home, keep a few things in mind. If possible, provide concrete examples of how this arrangement was successful in the past or how it will succeed. Suggest that you ease into it - spending a few days to a few weeks in the office at the outset, meeting people and getting to know procedures. Then, during the first three to six months on the new job, make frequent visits.

Sound good to you? Now it's a matter of finding the right fit for you. Here 10 occupations that telework friendly.

Recruiter
Attracting the most qualified employees and matching them to the jobs for which they are best suited is important for the success of any organization. Employment, recruitment and placement specialists recruit and evaluate applicants and attempt to match them with client firms. Most work in the personnel supply services industry.

Computer programmer
Given the technology available, telecommuting is becoming common for a wide range of computer professionals, including computer programmers. As computer networks expand, more programmers are able to make corrections or fix problems remotely by using modems, e-mail and the Internet to connect to a customer’s computer.

Financial advisor
Personal financial advisors generally assess the financial needs of individuals, providing them a wide range of options. Personal financial advisors, also called financial planners or financial consultants, use their knowledge of investments, tax laws and insurance to recommend financial options to individuals in accordance with their short-term and long-term goals. Some of the issues that planners address are retirement and estate planning, funding for college, and general investment options.

Media buyer
In the advertising industry, media buyers track the media space and times available for purchase, negotiate and purchase time and space for ads, and make sure ads appear exactly as scheduled. Additionally, they calculate rates, usage, and budgets.

Medical transcriptionist
Medical transcriptionists listen to dictated recordings made by physicians and other healthcare professionals and transcribe them into medical reports, correspondence and other administrative material. Many medical transcriptionists telecommute from home-based offices as employees or subcontractors for hospitals and transcription services or as self-employed, independent contractors.

Graphic designer
Graphic designers plan, analyze and create visual solutions to communications problems. They use a variety of print, electronic and film media and technologies to execute a design that meet clients’ communication needs. Graphic designers use computer software to develop the overall layout and production design of magazines, newspapers, journals, corporate reports and other publications.

Public relations specialist
Many radio or television special reports, newspaper stories, and magazine articles start on the desks of public relations specialists. Public relations specialists handle organizational functions such as media, community, consumer and governmental relations; political campaigns; interest-group representation; conflict mediation; or employee and investor relations. They prepare press releases and contact people in the media who might print or broadcast their material.

Real estate agent
Although these positions are telecommute-friendly, real estate brokers and sales agents often work evenings and weekends and usually are on call to suit the needs of clients. Besides making sales, agents and brokers must have properties to sell, they spend a significant amount of time obtaining listings - agreements by owners to place properties for sale with the firm.

Writer
This category includes technical, science, medical, freelance and online writers. Most jobs require a college degree in communications, journalism or English, although a degree in a technical subject may be useful for technical-writing positions. Most writers and editors have at least a basic familiarity with technology, regularly using personal computers, desktop or electronic publishing systems, scanners and other electronic communications equipment.

Sales representative
Sales representatives are an important part of manufacturer and wholesaler success. Regardless of the type of product they sell, their primary duties are to interest wholesale and retail buyers and purchasing agents in their merchandise, and to address any of the client’s questions or concerns. Sales representatives represent one or several manufacturers or wholesale distributors by selling one product or a complimentary line of products and also advise clients on methods to reduce costs, use their products, and increase sales.


© Copyright CareerBuilder.com 2004. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority.